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Tuesday, 22 April 2014 17:06

60 Day Notice For Rent Increase ...

Question: I have a building in Long Beach. It is occupied by a mother and daughter. The rent is $1,000 per month. The daughter wanted her new husband to move in so I had all three parties sign a one year lease agreement. The new rental amount was increased to $1,150. The lease was to commence at the beginning of the following month. My tenants are now telling me that since the rent increase exceeded 10%, that they were entitled to a 60-day notice before the rent could be increased. They are asking for a refund. What are my rights?   Answer: You do not have to return any rent and the rent increase was legal. If you are increasing the rent in excess of 10%, a 60-day rent increase is required. That is not the case in this instance. Everyone signed a new lease agreement. The law would view that different then a unilateral rent increase. As such, the lease is valid. Read More ...
Last modified on Tuesday, 22 April 2014 17:10
Thursday, 10 April 2014 18:18

Tenant refuses to give landlord a key ...

Question: One of my tenants is an attorney and is always quoting the law to me. Recently, he changed the locks, citing security issues, as there was a burglary on our block. He is refusing to give me a key. What are my options?   Answer: Your first option is to never rent to an attorney. They make terrible tenants. Check your lease agreement. Most agreements provide that the premises cannot be altered without the landlord's written consent. This would be considered an alteration. You should serve your "Perry Mason" with a Notice to Perform or Quit, giving this tenant 3 days to supply you with a key. If "Perry" does not comply, an eviction should be commenced. Read More ...
Last modified on Thursday, 10 April 2014 18:25
Thursday, 10 April 2014 18:02

Tenant failed to pay rent ...

Question: I recently bought my first rent controlled building in the City of Los Angeles. After the first month, one of the existing tenants failed to pay the rent so I served a 3-day notice to pay the rent or quit. When the tenant failed to pay the rent, my attorney filed an unlawful detainer action. At the trial, the tenant admitted he never paid the rent. His only defense was that I had not registered the unit with the Los Angeles Housing Department or served him a copy of the Registration Certificate. The unit is actually registered, but I did not serve a copy of the Registration Certificate. The judge ruled in favor of the tenant. Did the judge follow the law correctly?   Answer: The Rent Stabilization Ordinance for the City of Los Angeles clearly requires that the Registration Certificate be served on each tenant before a 3-day notice can be served. Even though the unit was registered, if you did not serve the certificate, the judge properly ruled that you did not comply with the law. If you need a copy of the Registration Certificate you can obtain one online at: (https:/lahd.lacity.org/Billing). It is good idea to serve the…
Last modified on Thursday, 10 April 2014 18:24
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